99 Problems and I can Solve Every Single One

99 Problems and I can Solve Every Single One

We frequently encounter problems for which we have no immediately available solution that will allow us to contact reinforcement or escape from an aversive situation. When this happens, we problem solve by prompting and probing our own behavior such that a solution to the problem becomes more likely. We have learned to problem solve by talking to ourselves, talking to others, looking around our environments, searching for answers online, posting questions in online forums, watching YouTube videos, using applications on our phones, and even re-arranging furniture. So much of our daily activity requires problem solving that we often take our ability to problem solve for granted. We might not even think about all the times during the day that we encounter problems that need to be solved because our problem-solving behavior has become so fluent. Problem solving is a learned behavior. Some people learn it incidentally, but others might require more explicit instruction. In this presentation I will define problem solving from a behavior analytic perspective, identify examples of problem solving that are common to everyday events, discuss problem-solving research, make some recommendations for future problem-solving research, and also share some suggestions for teaching problem solving in clinical practice.


Learning Objectives

  1. Participants will be able to define problem solving from a behavior analytic perspective.
  2. Participants will be able to identify types of problem situations commonly encountered by children, adolescents, and adults.\
  3. Participants will be able to summarize prior research on teaching problem solving to a range of individuals.
  4. Participants will be able to identify tactics for teaching problem solving to a range of individuals in their clinical practice.

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  • $20.00


Tags: webinar